News Feature

Blue Hill
Originally published in The Weekly Packet, November 14, 2013
Small parade highlights Veterans Day in Blue Hill

Blue Hill Veterans Day parade

The Veterans Day parade—with a cadre of military vehicles and waving veterans—makes its way through downtown Blue Hill on Monday, November 11.

Photo by Faith DeAmbrose Order prints of selected PBP photos.

by Faith DeAmbrose

A handful of veterans gathered at Blue Hill’s Duffy-Wescott American Legion Post #85 to participate in the first ever (at least in recent memory) Veterans Day parade held in town. Flanked by fire trucks on each end, a half dozen military vehicles left the legion hall, traveled through the village and then returned. Dozens of spectators lined the streets.

The observance began with words from the Rev. Rob McCall of the First Congregational Church of Blue Hill. He directed the words to veterans, their spouses and children—“all who have paid the cost of war.” Reading from a book published in 1918 “after the First World War,” he shared a number of entries aimed at defining war and its impact on a community.

The idea to hold the parade came from Blue Hill resident Chris Niehoff—a military enthusiast whose parents were both veterans, explained Reggie Nevells of the American Legion, adding that it was deemed a success and the organization will hold another parade next year. “Next year we hope to make it larger; hope more veterans will join,” said Nevells, adding that the climate supporting veterans has increased dramatically during the last few decades. “Veterans get a lot more recognition than they used to,” he said, “so we might as well keep pushing that forward.”

Rev. Rob McCall on Veterans Day

The Rev. Rob McCall of the First Congregational Church of Blue Hill addresses those in attendance at Blue Hill’s Veterans Day parade.

Photo by Faith DeAmbrose
Blue Hill Veterans Day parade

The Veterans Day parade—with a cadre of military vehicles and waving veterans—makes its way through downtown Blue Hill on Monday, November 11.

Photo by Faith DeAmbrose