News Feature

Surry
Originally published in The Weekly Packet, May 9, 2013
Surry Community Improvement Association presents awards, donation at annual dinner

Ted Fletcher with his community service award

Ted Fletcher received a community service award for, among other things, faithfully arranging transportation for those unable to get to medical appointments.

Photo by Bette Britt Order prints of selected PBP photos.

by Bette Britt

Civic-minded residents who have become accustomed to hearing about pre-town meeting topics when gathering at the Surry Civic Center/school gymnasium joined the Surry Community Improvement Association for its annual community awards dinner on Monday, May 6, and learned about a project that will put their town on the map.

Perhaps not literally, but after autumn 2014 Surry should have its own sculpture installed at the town landing. Just like Deer Isle, Blue Hill, Ellsworth and Bar Harbor, that should mean Surry’s site will be on the brochure of the Schoodic International Sculpture Symposium’s “Sculpture Tour.”

As explained by sculptor Jesse Salisbury, SISS Artistic Director, Surry is one of seven communities to be added to the 27 already boasting public stone sculpture installations dating from 2007, 2009 and 2011. Castine, Bucksport, Calais and Eastport are among the other towns anticipating something special for their landscapes in 2014, according to Salisbury, who detailed the creative process of building “a public sculpture collection in eastern Maine” to SCIA listeners. There will be local input from inspecting portfolios of each sculptor’s “style” before picking out the style of Surry’s sculpture.

Trustees were then called forward and, clustered around Max Brenninkmeyer, watched as he pulled out a huge “check” for $500, which Pat Hollenberg then presented to Salisbury. It was seed money toward a $12,000 local share for the unique sculpture whose estimated final cost will be $40,000 - $60,000.

Presentation of citations to citizens who’ve served Surry well during the past year—and often far beyond that—included a special “service to the community” award to Terry Fletcher in acknowledgment of his work in arranging rides for folks who need transportation for a variety of appointments. “New volunteer drivers are always needed,” Fletcher reminded those present.

The second award, in this case awards, was made to women whose work in the town office hasn’t escaped the eyes of selectmen Steve Bemiss, Bill Matlock and Dale Sprinkle. Getting Town Clerk/Office Manager Angela Smith and Tax Collector Darcel Winslow to come to the dinner took a bit of deceit from Bemiss, who told Winslow they should attend because he was making a presentation to the other selectmen. The ruse worked, as the duo appeared and heard themselves praised for being able and willing to do everything necessary to make the town office run smoothly. They’re always there to remind the selectmen of people in need, noted Bemiss, adding that the office staff has “impeccable manners” and is “always there with pleasant greetings.” At least one, he implied, was “pretty close to being able to decipher (his) handwriting.” Hugs and handshakes followed presentation of SCIA citations to the town office staff.

SCIA Awards

Pat Hollenberg shows mock-up of SCIA check to sculptor Jesse Salisbury, as trustees applaud the gesture which kicks-off fund-raising for Surry project.

Photo by Bette Britt
Ted Fletcher with his community service award

Ted Fletcher received a community service award for, among other things, faithfully arranging transportation for those unable to get to medical appointments.

Photo by Bette Britt