News Feature

Surry
Originally published in The Weekly Packet, December 13, 2012
Partnership with Vanderbilt University brings hands-on learning to the classroom
Surry students enter the science pipeline

Nick Kane, Hannah Richards and Amelia Hayden

A partnership with Vanderbilt University and Surry Elementary School creates a science pipeline to the workforce. From left, fifth-grade science students Nick Kane, Hannah Richards and Amelia Hayden.

Photo by Anne Berleant Order prints of selected PBP photos.

by Anne Berleant

Each week, Surry fourth- and fifth-graders take a virtual science class via laptops, a pull-down screen, and collaboration with Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Tennessee.

Students perform experiments, look over data and their observations “and discuss what happens and why,” said fifth-grader Nick Kane. “Each week we have a new focus.”

Chemical changes, pH levels, human reflexes and the central nervous system were covered in November. “Now we are learning about the circulatory system,” Kane said.

Using Skype videoconferencing technology, students perform hands-on science under the leadership of scientists in Aspirnaut, a program that partners Vanderbilt University scientists with rural K-12 schools.

Their first lesson, “Chemistry in a Ziploc Bag,” had students add phenol red to baking soda, record their observations, and then add calcium chloride to the mix. What happens now?

Amelia Hayden and fellow student Hannah Richard performed the experiment for school board members on December 4.

“It’s getting warm,” said fifth-grader Hayden. “The bag is filling up with air, but it’s a gas.”

Aspirnaut’s goal is to be a pipeline that recruits and develops future science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, professionals.

“This is the very best that technology can afford us for increasing science in the school,” said Principal Cathy Lewis, who was approached by state senator Brian Langley to pilot an Aspirnaut program in Otis, where she was interim principal in 2010-11.

The Mount Desert Biological Laboratory “brought us to Maine originally,” said Julie Hudson, a Vanderbilt University scientist. Aspirnaut first started in rural Arkansas schools, she said, but Maine and Arkansas deal with many of the same issues, such as the disappearance of “traditional ways people earn a living after high school.”

“Half the jobs in the next 20 years will require a solid STEM background,” Hudson said.

With STEM education resources not passing beyond “the first two rings of metro areas,” Hudson said, “there’s “a lot of highly intelligent, motivated students that are off the radar.”

Aspirnaut—a nonprofit organization funded by Vanderbilt University, grants and private donations—uses summer internships, videoconferencing and equipping school buses with Wi-Fi and laptops for long rides as a rural pipeline for the future STEM workforce.

“Dollars invested in rural areas have a high return,” she said. “We’re dealing with young, talented minds.”

“Chemistry in a Ziploc Bag”

Hannah Richards, left, and Amelia Hayden perform “Chemistry in a Ziploc Bag” for school board members on December 4.

Photo by Anne Berleant
Scientist Julie Hudson of Vanderbilt University

Scientist Julie Hudson of Vanderbilt University uses videoconferencing to teach Surry fifth-graders such as Nick Kane, above.

Photo by Anne Berleant
Cathy Lewis introduces fifth-graders

Surry Elementary School interim principal Cathy Lewis introduces fifth-graders, from left, Hannah Richards, Nick Kane and Amelia Hayden to school board members gathered for a science and videoconference demonstration on December 4.

Photo by Anne Berleant
Nick Kane, Hannah Richards and Amelia Hayden

A partnership with Vanderbilt University and Surry Elementary School creates a science pipeline to the workforce. From left, fifth-grade science students Nick Kane, Hannah Richards and Amelia Hayden.

Photo by Anne Berleant